Norwegians fickle to immigration, Muslim insults continued / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norwegians fickle to immigration, Muslim insults continued. As the child asylum seeker debate continues, it seems Norwegians cannot decide about the country’s immigration policy, with post 22nd July bomb anti-foreigner derogatory remarks common. 400 tri-partite coalition voters told Aftenposten they want to stop deportation of the some 450 paperless children living in Norway’s state-run asylum seeker centres temporarily.  Excluding the Conservatives (H) and Progress (FrP), a majority voters for the other Parties would also like to see SV’s (Socialist Left) three-year rule proposition introduced, which allows children living in Norway to stay after that time.

andersbehringbreivik, anti-immigrantfeelingnorway, norwegianxenophobia



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Norwegians fickle to immigration, Muslim insults continued

Published on Wednesday, 21st March, 2012 at 18:01 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 21st March 2012 at 19:07.

As the child asylum seeker debate continues, it seems Norwegians cannot decide about the country’s immigration policy, with post 22nd July bomb anti-foreigner derogatory remarks common.



“A dilemma”

400 tri-partite coalition voters told Aftenposten they want to stop deportation of the some 450 paperless children living in Norway’s state-run asylum seeker centres temporarily. 

Excluding the Conservatives (H) and Progress (FrP), a majority voters for the other Parties would also like to see SV’s (Socialist Left) three-year rule proposition introduced, which allows children living in Norway to stay after that time.

At the same time, Aftenposten’s poll shows approximately 66 percent of voters think the current stricter immigration policy should generally remain the way it is, or increase in its strictness. Just 18 percent favour a relaxation of the rules.

Labour’s (Ap) Deputy Minister of Justice, Pål Lønnseth, calls this “a dilemma”, highlighting “it’s impossible to be fair and at the same time have one’s cake and eat it.”

Whilst FrP leader Siv Jensen is non-committal either way, Trine Skei Grande, leader of the Liberal Party (V) and SV’s leader Audun Lysbakken find Aftenposten’s survey positive. 

Before Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg reportedly faced the music in today’s parliamentary question time, according to Aftenposten, Trine Skei Grande discounted Pål Lønnseth’s claims this shows voter vagueness, at the same time saying, “The figures show the PM underestimates the voters.”

“They are not that stupid. People wish to grant a limited group, children, in this case, stronger rights at the same time as keeping a strict policy. It is possible,” she declared.

According to Audun Lysbakken, the former Minister of Children, Equality, and Social Inclusion, “This [the survey] demonstrates the large public engagement for asylum seeker minors. Nevertheless, the figures are also a paradox. Many people favour a restrictive policy when confronted with the statistics, but want an easing when faced with real persons.”

Targets 

Meanwhile, some media articles have shown some Norwegians’ attitudes towards immigrants in general have improved since Anders Behring Breivik’s twin attacks. A new first report from the Centre Against Racism now paints a slightly different picture, however.

A number of Muslims and immigrants experienced harassment and attacks in the interim period between the Oslo bomb explosion and Utøya shootings until a white person claimed responsibility. Nearly all of the 60-70 people, plus the 15 other interviewees staff spoke to said they had experienced a strong feeling of fear, despite hugs and positive attention from people. 

Whilst some of the accounts included menacing words, behaviour and being shouted at, one person was threatened with a knife several times, another was kicked, and a third thrown off a bus and beaten up. Other, more graphic accounts are not reported in this article. 

In conclusion, Centre Against Racism personnel many of the people “find it difficult to talk about violence against and harassment of immigrants following the bomb explosion. Most do not want to start a negative debate about immigrants, and some people still fear they will be the target of hate in their daily life.”

“Hate crimes are generally underreported, and there is a widespread perception amongst many immigrants that cases that are reported end up being shelved.”



Published on Wednesday, 21st March, 2012 at 18:01 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 21st March 2012 at 19:07.

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, anti-immigrantfeelingnorway, norwegianxenophobia.





  
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