Norwegians’ intercultural marriage awkwardness down / News / The Foreigner

Norwegians’ intercultural marriage awkwardness down. The number of Norwegians uncomfortable about these partnerships sinks by almost 10 per cent in two years, Statistics Norway’s (SSB) survey finds. 25 per cent were not happy if their son or daughter wanted to marry an immigrant when asked in 2013. It was 23 per cent the following year. In 2015, 17 per cent said they would find it uncomfortable. This is also a 23 per cent decrease on 2002’s highest, which was 40 per cent.

immigration, foreigners, residence, , paywall



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Norwegians’ intercultural marriage awkwardness down

Published on Tuesday, 12th January, 2016 at 22:42 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 22nd January 2016 at 21:13.

The number of Norwegians uncomfortable about these partnerships sinks by almost 10 per cent in two years, Statistics Norway’s (SSB) survey finds.

UWC Red Cross Nordic
UWC Red Cross Nordic
Photo: Jonas Löwgren/Flickr


25 per cent were not happy if their son or daughter wanted to marry an immigrant when asked in 2013. It was 23 per cent the following year.

In 2015, 17 per cent said they would find it uncomfortable. This is also a 23 per cent decrease on 2002’s highest, which was 40 per cent.

The issue of residence permits gives a different picture. Moreover, officials stress that the latest poll “was conducted in July and August (6th-15th), when the number of asylum seekers was considerably lower than in the autumn.”

50 per cent thought that access to permanent residence should be “the same as today”, and 29 per cent thought that it should be more difficult.

15 per cent agreed on the question asked that it should be easier to get a residence permit in Norway.

This is a slight decline on 2014’s figures, when those who thought getting a residence permit should be easier comprised 18 per cent of respondents.

The SSB took several other factors into account in their latest survey.

87 per cent agreed that ‘all immigrants in Norway should have the same job opportunities as Norwegians’ (either strongly or on the whole). 8 per cent disagreed.

“The economic turnaround in the wake of the falling oil prices has apparently not led to a change in attitudes on these matters,” SSB officials say.

73 per cent agreed (strongly or wholly) that that ‘most immigrants make an important contribution to Norwegian working life’. 11 per cent disagreed.

57 per cent disagreed with the ‘most immigrants represent a source of insecurity in society’ statement, with 26 per cent agreeing.

The statement that ‘most immigrants enrich the cultural life in Norway’ saw 72 per cent agree and 14 per cent disagreed.

52 per cent disagreed with the statement that ‘most immigrants abuse the social welfare system’, while 25 per cent agreed.

The responses to immigrants and their performance in society do not differ greatly to 2014’s results.

Other figures show that 7 per cent of those asked said they would find it embarrassing if either they or someone in their immediate family were to get domestic help from an immigrant.

4 per cent disliked the idea of having an immigrant as a neighbour. This was the same as in earlier years, according to the SSB.

Statistics Norway also points out an increase in the number of people who have contact with immigrants – up 8 percentage points.

Currently at 78 per cent, this figure is the same as in 2013 following “a divergent fall in the preceding year’s survey.”

“The most common form of contact is through work and among friends and acquaintances. Those who have contact with immigrants also report that the contact is slightly more frequent than before. The share who have daily or weekly contact is 87 per cent; 6 percentage points higher than in 2014,” officials explain.

And attitudes vary according to background factors.

  • Women are usually somewhat more liberal or positive towards immigrants and immigration than men.
  • The elderly (around 67-79) were found to be more sceptical.
  • The youngest respondents (16-24), or the slightly older ones (25-44 years) were often more immigrant friendly depending on the subject.
  • Groups identified as more immigrant-friendly include those with a higher education, those who have contact with immigrants, and those living in urban areas with more than 100,000 inhabitants.

Statistics Norway’s annual survey on attitudes towards immigrants and immigration is conducted on behalf of the Ministry of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion.

The aim is to reflect the sentiment of the population with regard to various aspects of the country’s immigration and refugee policy and towards immigrants as a group, remark officials.




Published on Tuesday, 12th January, 2016 at 22:42 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 22nd January 2016 at 21:13.

This post has the following tags: immigration, foreigners, residence, , paywall.





  
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