Norwegians’ workload evenly distributed / News / The Foreigner

Norwegians’ workload evenly distributed. Dual income families in Norway share the week’s work, a new study conducted for the Research Council of Norway shows. The inquiry looked into how families shared work that was both paid and unpaid. The results suggest work is evenly distributed. “A key aim of Norwegian policy is to promote an equal distribution of paid and unpaid work among dual-earner couples with children. Despite our political aspirations, up until now we have not really known how common this type of family is in Norway today,” said Statistics Norway (SSB) researcher Ragni Hege Kitterød.

norwayworkingfamiliesstudy, norwaydualincomefamilies



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Norwegians’ workload evenly distributed

Published on Monday, 23rd January, 2012 at 12:30 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Dual income families in Norway share the week’s work, a new study conducted for the Research Council of Norway shows.

Working week
Working week
Photo: Ed Yourdon/Flickr


The inquiry looked into how families shared work that was both paid and unpaid. The results suggest work is evenly distributed.

“A key aim of Norwegian policy is to promote an equal distribution of paid and unpaid work among dual-earner couples with children. Despite our political aspirations, up until now we have not really known how common this type of family is in Norway today,” said Statistics Norway (SSB) researcher Ragni Hege Kitterød.

Using a group of men and women who have children between one and 12 years old, Ragni Hege Kitterød and colleague Trude Lappegård then enquired how tasks such as housework and childcare was shared.

Participants were also asked about how many hours of paid work they worked each week and whether they worked overtime or brought work home.

The researchers found there were four different types of families: Neo-Traditional, Gender-Equal Light, Generalised Gender Equal and Specialised Gender Equal.

Neo-Traditional families saw the mother usually only working part time and taking the main role when it came to domestic work.

Gender-Equal Light families saw the mother working part or full time and taking the lead with housework but sharing the childcare responsibility.

The third group, Generalised Gender Equal, are families that have both parents working full time and sharing the housework and childcare equally.

Specialised Gender Equal families saw the mother working full time and sometimes more as well, and the father working at least full time.

The similarity between the groups however was that the father often had the responsibility when it came to maintenance work in the home.

Researchers found that around 40% of couples share both pain and unpaid work equally between them.

“This is common when both, or perhaps just the mother, have a high level of education, when both have day jobs during regular work hours, and when the father works in the public sector”, Ragni Hege Kitterød said.



Published on Monday, 23rd January, 2012 at 12:30 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwayworkingfamiliesstudy, norwaydualincomefamilies.





  
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