Oslo base stations are likely to be false, Norwegian security officials say / News / The Foreigner

Oslo base stations are likely to be false, Norwegian security officials say. UPDATED: As several of Norway’s security services look into the reported IMSI Catchers in the capital, the NSM announces its conclusion following investigations over a short period of time. Norway’s National Security Authority (NSM) submitted its expected report to the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Defence, and the Police Security Service (PST), Monday. “We have made investigations over several days, using different methods and technical tools. Our main conclusion is that it is likely that the findings Aftenposten has made through their investigations are real,” NSM Director General Kjetil Nilsen said in a statement.

imsi, spying, mobiles, politics, espionage, surveillance, norway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Oslo base stations are likely to be false, Norwegian security officials say

Published on Monday, 15th December, 2014 at 14:43 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 8th January 2015 at 00:45.

UPDATED: As several of Norway’s security services look into the reported IMSI Catchers in the capital, the NSM announces its conclusion following investigations over a short period of time.

Oslo skyline
Oslo skyline
Photo: Inez Dawczyk/The Foreigner


Norway’s National Security Authority (NSM) submitted its expected report to the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Defence, and the Police Security Service (PST), Monday.

“We have made investigations over several days, using different methods and technical tools. Our main conclusion is that it is likely that the findings Aftenposten has made through their investigations are real,” NSM Director General Kjetil Nilsen said in a statement.

Officials at the NSM also pointed out that they use the term “likely”, as drawing absolute conclusions is not possible.

This is partly due to the limited time and scope of the investigations. The NSM stated as well that no further comment regarding individual findings of details of investigations will be issued.

The weekend’s news has also prompted the PST, who has warned mobile subscribers not to reveal confidential information while speaking, to start an investigation.

According to PST press spokesperson Siv Alsen, their investigation is to “examine whether the information that has emerged lately surrounding fake base stations concerns illegal intelligence activities for foreign states’ advantage.”

Oslo Police District has announced it too is to start investigating possible illegal surveillance in the capital’s financial district in and around the Tjuvholmen area. This will be in conjunction with the PST “and other relevant actors,” police said.

Security and police service head man Minister of Justice Anders Anundsen declared that the surveillance method is “completely unacceptable.”

Opposition MPs have demanded that Minister Anundsen makes an account to parliament regarding the hitherto unknown surveillance. Who is behind it is not yet known.

Jenny Klinge MP, representative on parliament’s Standing Committee on Justice for the Centre Party (Sp), told The Foreigner that “from what the PST is saying, it looks as though it might be other players.”

“And it’s a grave matter if it isn’t Norwegian security authorities themselves who are behind this.”

The Opposition has called in Minister Anundsen to parliament to account for the situation. What do you think should happen now?

“It’s obviously important that he apprises us of the situation. We wonder what the Norwegian security authorities are doing themselves to uncover this type of activity.”

Ms Klinge also said that of course politicians must be aware of what they say on the mobile, and that they should certainly leave them outside the meeting rooms on certain occasions.

“But it shouldn’t be the case that the biggest work the PST does to avoid problems with surveillance is to inform us to be cautious. We must be able to expect that Norwegian security authorities also work to prevent and detect surveillance so that the risk is not as substantial,” she concluded.




Published on Monday, 15th December, 2014 at 14:43 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 8th January 2015 at 00:45.

This post has the following tags: imsi, spying, mobiles, politics, espionage, surveillance, norway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!