Oslo Science Conference 2010 News: Polar Areas Dynamics Indicate Global Changes / News / The Foreigner

Oslo Science Conference 2010 News: Polar Areas Dynamics Indicate Global Changes. Changes in the polar areas might have an irreversible global impact, Professor Katherine Richardson warned the audience on the third IPY-OSC day. She pointed out that the glaciers’ meltdown will affect not only the land surface, but also ocean microorganisms, with long-term repercussions upon food chains and, implicitly, upon  various species. Professor Richardson further highlighted the importance of not exceeding what she termed as “pressure points”, comparing the well-being of the planet with a person’s health.

oslo, science, conference, polar, research, icebergs, sea, ice, sheet, norwegian,



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Oslo Science Conference 2010 News: Polar Areas Dynamics Indicate Global Changes

Published on Friday, 11th June, 2010 at 08:05 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

Changes in the polar areas might have an irreversible global impact, Professor Katherine Richardson warned the audience on the third IPY-OSC day.

Blood pressure
Blood pressure
Photo: Joey.Parson/Flickr


She pointed out that the glaciers’ meltdown will affect not only the land surface, but also ocean microorganisms, with long-term repercussions upon food chains and, implicitly, upon  various species.

Professor Richardson further highlighted the importance of not exceeding what she termed as “pressure points”, comparing the well-being of the planet with a person’s health.

“It’s just like blood pressure; if it goes over 120/80 it doesn’t mean something bad will necessarily happen. But the risk increases, and you would do everything possible to reduce it below this point again,” she argued.

Her conclusion was that the consequences of polar changes cannot be accurately assessed because of the significant lack of information.

“We know that some changes in the polar regions are felt globally, like melting ice and changes in ocean circulation. We suspect that many others may be felt globally, like changes in carbon cycling and in food webs. While the mechanisms are not (yet) well understood, it is usually the ocean that brings the message of polar change to the global arena,” she said.



Published on Friday, 11th June, 2010 at 08:05 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

This post has the following tags: oslo, science, conference, polar, research, icebergs, sea, ice, sheet, norwegian, .





  
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