Oslo University marks improve / News / The Foreigner

Oslo University marks improve. The Norwegian capital’s educational institution regains its position following a two-year spell of inferior results, latest research shows. QS’ World University Rankings 2016/17 put the University of Oslo in 113th place. Talking about the 13th edition of their scores, the organisation says that “the University of Oslo enjoys a large performance improvement.” “It is again Norway’s best university” staff continues.

universities, oslo, education, study, academics, students, paywall



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Oslo University marks improve

Published on Wednesday, 7th September, 2016 at 19:29 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 21st September 2016 at 23:28.

The Norwegian capital’s educational institution regains its position following a two-year spell of inferior results, latest research shows.

Mortarboard
Mortarboard
Photo: Heath Doman/Shutterstock Images


QS’ World University Rankings 2016/17 put the University of Oslo in 113th place. Talking about the 13th edition of their scores, the organisation says that “the University of Oslo enjoys a large performance improvement.”

“It is again Norway’s best university” staff continues.

The University of Bergen is ranked 177th, up six places from last year, whilst the University of Tromsø rose some 50 places, coming in in 377th place.

Trondheim’s NTNU, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, returned a slightly inferior result this year, falling five places to 259th.

Down and up    

2010 to 2015 have been variable for the University of Oslo, however, with four out of those five years having seen it either at, or dipping below a hundred.

Its respective places were 100th in 2010, 108th in 2011 (down eight), 111th in 2012 (down a further three), 89th in 2013 (up 22), 101st in 2014 (down 12), and 135th in 2015 (down 34).

The University’s rankings have swung considerably between 2012 and now. Why is that?

“It is important to keep in mind that rankings are relative for any meaningful interpretation of the results,” Baerbel Eckelmann, QS Intelligence Unit Senior Research tells The Foreigner.

“So the performance of one institution is always relative to other institutions being part of the evaluation. In other words, a decline in positioning does not necessarily mean a decline in institutional performance,” she continues.

Regarding its declines in 2014 (-12 places) and 2015 (-34 places), why did the University show this large drop for these years?

“[In 2014,] the institution dropped due to a decline in positioning for both academic and employer reputation indicators, which contributes 50% to the overall score. In addition, the University of Oslo lost positioning in the Faculty Student indicator which accounts for 20%. Any decline / improvement in those indicators with higher weightings assigned to them will have an impact on the overall rank.”

“The institution continued to lose positioning in the Faculty Student indicator [in 2015], however, the bigger and more significant drop is due to a decline in Citations per Faculty. Though, the latter is a result of methodological changes rather than institutional performance. In 2015, two significant modifications were applied: Papers featuring authors from more than ten affiliated institutions have been excluded and Faculty Area Normalization,” QS’ Baerbel Eckelmann also explains.

What were the reasons for Oslo’s 2012-13 improvement (111 to 89)?

“Compared to the year before, the University of Oslo was able to improve its positioning in employer reputation (nearly 10 positions), Faculty Student Ratio (nearly 20 positions), Citation per faculty (more than 40 positions) and International Faculty (nearly 70 positions),” says Ms Eckelmann.

Nordic noir

2015, an annus horribilis for the Nordic Countries’ principle capital city-located universities, saw the University of Oslo sink a further 34 places to 135th.

The educational institution also trailed its Danish counterpart between 2010 and 2015, when the University of Copenhagen was ranked 45th, 52nd, 51st, 45th (in 2013 and 2014), and 69th, respectively.

Finland’s University of Helsinki beat the University of Oslo in these years too. Its respective positions were 75th, 89th, 78th, 69th, 67th, and 96th.

But Sweden’s Stockholm University was by far the worst performer, coming in at 168th place in 2010.

Its respective positions for the following four years were 178th, 171st, 170th, and 182nd (in 2014 and 2015).

QS’ latest rankings put the University of Copenhagen in 68th place (down one on 2015), and the University of Helsinki 91st (up four on last year).

Stockholm University comes bottom again – in 196th position (down 14 on last year).

The top ten educational institutions for 2016/17, in descending order, are:

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, US)
  • Stanford University (US)
  • Harvard University (US)
  • University of Cambridge (UK)
  • California Institute of Technology (Caltech, US)
  • University of Oxford (UK)
  • University College London (UCL, UK)
  • ETH Zurich – Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Switzerland)
  • Imperial College London (UK)
  • University of Chicago (US)

916 educational institutions from 81 countries were ranked, with over 3,800 considered for inclusion.

Facts about the QS World University Rankings:

  • An annual league table of the top universities in the world
  • Compiled by the QS Intelligence Unit in close consultation with an international advisory board of leading academics
  • Based on four key pillars: research, teaching, employability and internationalisation
  • Methodology consists of six indicators: academic reputation (40%), employer reputation (10%), faculty-student ratio (20%), citations per faculty (20%), international students (5%), and international faculty (5%)

The full rankings can be found here (external link).

Norway’s Ministry of Education's comment regarding this year’s results can be found at the end of this article.




Published on Wednesday, 7th September, 2016 at 19:29 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 21st September 2016 at 23:28.

This post has the following tags: universities, oslo, education, study, academics, students, paywall.





  
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