Parasites found in Norwegian salmon / News / The Foreigner

Parasites found in Norwegian salmon. Scientists say there is evidence that Norwegian farmed salmon contains a form of roundworm known as nematode. A study performed by the National Veterinary Institute last year looked at looked at sample of 100 fish farmed in the same cage. 50 were too small and in poor condition (known as “runts”), while the other 50 were originally intended to be sent on to consumers. Scientists state nematodes were not found in these 50 fish, but “seventy‐five nematodes were found in 10 (20%) of the 50 “runts”.

norwaysalmonfarming, nematodessalmon



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Parasites found in Norwegian salmon

Published on Monday, 17th September, 2012 at 10:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 17th September 2012 at 15:12.

Scientists say there is evidence that Norwegian farmed salmon contains a form of roundworm known as nematode.

Salmon
Salmon
Photo: Natalie Maynor/Flickr


A study performed by the National Veterinary Institute last year looked at looked at sample of 100 fish farmed in the same cage.

50 were too small and in poor condition (known as “runts”), while the other 50 were originally intended to be sent on to consumers. Scientists state nematodes were not found in these 50 fish, but “seventy‐five nematodes were found in 10 (20%) of the 50 “runts”.

National Veterinary Institute officials say the parasite can burrow into the wall of the intestine causing nausea and fever if alive when eaten. Known as Anisakis simplex (A. Simplex), it can also cause perforation of the intestine in very rare cases.

According to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), “Many traditional marinating and cold smoking methods are not sufficient to kill A. simplex and freezing or heat treatments remain the most effective processes guaranteeing killing.”

“All wild caught seawater and freshwater fish are must be considered at risk of containing any viable parasites of human health concern if these products are to be eaten raw or almost raw.”

The scientific committee/scientific panel also found that “for farmed Atlantic salmon reared in floating cages or onshore tanks and fed on compound feedstuffs however, the current risk of infection with anisakids (a group containing cestodes, trematodes and nematodes) is negligible.”

Norway’s Seafood Federation (FHL) has said it is satisfied with the current situation stating that previous studies of the fish have shown it to be safe to eat raw and no nematodes have been found in fish sent for human consumption.

Henrik Stenwig, head of department for health and quality, tells The Foreigner, “These specimens were picked out from fish at the slaughterhouse removed as waste products. They would never have reached the market for human consumption.”

Norwegian salmon is exempt from EFAS’s requirement for fish that are to be eaten raw as the salmon is fed on dry food.

“Moreover, the European Food Safety Authority has concluded the risk of nematodes in salmon is negligible, and the European Commission has adopted an amendment to salmon hygiene legislation saying there is no need to freeze the fish before it is consumed.”

Nonetheless, Tore Atle Mo, head of section parasitology at the Veterinary Institute, believes the exemption should not be in place.

“The salmon don’t just eat dried food while in the cages but also live prey, such as crustaceans. These crustaceans are termed intermediate hosts. Whales, known as transport hosts, also eat salmon. Both the whale’s and human body temperature are the same.”

“Nematodes cannot complete their lifecycle in humans. They have not been found in fish for human consumption, but we believe the risk is still there. There are several thousand cases involving nematodes every year, including in Japan and southern Europe,” Mr Mo concludes.




Published on Monday, 17th September, 2012 at 10:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 17th September 2012 at 15:12.

This post has the following tags: norwaysalmonfarming, nematodessalmon.





  
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