Parents drop Nordics-specific names / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Parents drop Nordics-specific names. Fewer and fewer parents are giving their children names containing the vowels ø, æ and å, Statistics Norway figures show. Nordic names are the only ones containing these letters, according to Gulbrand Alhaug, professor of Scandinavian Linguistics at northern Norway’s University of Tromsø. While these are seeing a general decline, “some [parents] will probably also try to avoid these letters because they want their children to do well internationally,” he told NRK.

nordic, names, births



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Parents drop Nordics-specific names

Published on Friday, 18th July, 2014 at 00:22 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 18th July 2014 at 00:37.

Fewer and fewer parents are giving their children names containing the vowels ø, æ and å, Statistics Norway figures show.



Nordic names are the only ones containing these letters, according to Gulbrand Alhaug, professor of Scandinavian Linguistics at northern Norway’s University of Tromsø.

While these are seeing a general decline, “some [parents] will probably also try to avoid these letters because they want their children to do well internationally,” he told NRK.

Examples of names containing these letters are Øystein, Sæbjørn, and Håkon for boys, Frøya, Kjærsti, and Åse for girls.

Professor Alhaug recently gave a lecture on the subject of Nordic names at a congress in Denmark.

He believes it is hard to predict where naming trends will go as names are affected by factors which include education, the media, literature, and pop music.

“We are strongly influenced by international trends as well. Linnea, for example, is a name that has long been popular in Sweden. It is now popular in Norway,” the Professor added.

At the same time, some Nordic names have been internationalised. One example is the Swedish physicist’s Anders Jonas Ångström (1814-74).

The Ångström (symbol ‘Å’) is a unit of length expressing the sizes of atoms and molecules, for example. It is equal to one ten-billionth of a metre (10−10 m) – or 0.1 nm.




Published on Friday, 18th July, 2014 at 00:22 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 18th July 2014 at 00:37.

This post has the following tags: nordic, names, births.





  
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