Peak rise in Norwegian gas emissions / News / The Foreigner

Peak rise in Norwegian gas emissions. Norway has the highest levels of CO2 emissions recorded since 1990, recent data published by the state statistics bureau SSB shows. Levels are now recorded to be as high as 53.7 million tonnes of CO2 equivalents, the highest recorded in over 10 years, despite a steady decrease in emissions since 2008 At the Fighting Climate Change with Carbon Capture and Storage conference in Bergen, Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg told reporters, “We must make deep cuts in global greenhouse gas emissions”.

kaarstoe, mongstad, statoil, ccs, co2



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Peak rise in Norwegian gas emissions

Published on Monday, 30th May, 2011 at 18:45 under the news category, by Kyle Blythe.
Last Updated on 30th May 2011 at 18:57.

Norway has the highest levels of CO2 emissions recorded since 1990, recent data published by the state statistics bureau SSB shows.

Kårstø plant aerial view (illus. ph.)
Kårstø plant aerial view (illus. ph.)
Photo: Øyvind Hagen/Statoil


Levels are now recorded to be as high as 53.7 million tonnes of CO2 equivalents, the highest recorded in over 10 years, despite a steady decrease in emissions since 2008

At the Fighting Climate Change with Carbon Capture and Storage conference in Bergen, Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg told reporters, “We must make deep cuts in global greenhouse gas emissions”.

Although Norway has a strong focus on prevention and reduction of emissions at an international level, it is still recognized as one of the worst offenders.

The EUObserver reported the Prime Minister offered European Union countries approximately €140 million (about 1 billion kroner) in 2009 to support the development of carbon capture and storage projects (CCS). Nevertheless, the CCS project sparked great controversy from environmentalists, who argued it was removing focus from Norway’s own problem. 

With the opening of Kårstø Power Station in 2007, a renewed growth in transport emissions and an increase in the demand for metal production, particularly ferroalloys, national targets for emission reduction has been severely missed.

Norway is bound by two important international protocols designed to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Gothenburg Protocol aims to reduce sulphur emissions by enforcing ceiling levels, which in turn reduce acidification, eutrophication and ground-level ozone levels.

Its targets comprise four gases, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and ammonia. Norway has failed to reduce all but two or these. Reductions of Nitrogen oxides fell by over 35,000 tonnes (18 per cent) over the past four years, providing perhaps a glimmer of hope.

Norway’s other commitments under the Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement under which participating nations have promised to address global warming and greenhouse gas emission issues, set its emissions target at one percent over 1990, equalling 50 million tons of CO2. Allowances were made for exceeding this target if Norway purchased additional quotas from other countries, giving rise to the CCS.

Nevertheless, with pilot projects in place such as the Statoil-run Sleipner project, supporters argue realising commercial viability for CCS cannot be envisioned before 2020 or 2030. Government officials also express regret that Statoil’s Mongstad plant will delay targets further, with justification for CCS not yet foreseeable within the next decade.

Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Rajenda Pachauri, opposes claims from the opposition, however, stating, "They are free to hold their opinion. Whenever there is anything new around, there is always a level of scepticism. We should dispel this by showing that the new technology works."



Published on Monday, 30th May, 2011 at 18:45 under the news category, by Kyle Blythe.
Last updated on 30th May 2011 at 18:57.

This post has the following tags: kaarstoe, mongstad, statoil, ccs, co2.





  
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