Police sickness puts the brakes on speeding cases / News / The Foreigner

Police sickness puts the brakes on speeding cases. Illness and lack of money are forcing police to turn off speed cameras in several Norwegian regions. Motorists’ speed goes up, whilst the number of processed cases goes down. The problem is particularly acute for police in Oslo. Figures from 2010 show the Våleranga tunnel was the most efficient surveillance point, with an average of 11 drivers caught speeding per hour. However, the camera was turned off regularly, and the number of controlled cars fell by 13 percent last year. Only three people are employed at the police’s Centre for Automatic Traffic Surveillance (ATK) office.

policespeedcameras, staffillness, automatictrafficcontrols



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Police sickness puts the brakes on speeding cases

Published on Friday, 11th March, 2011 at 07:30 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

Illness and lack of money are forcing police to turn off speed cameras in several Norwegian regions. Motorists’ speed goes up, whilst the number of processed cases goes down.

BMW 320d speedometer
BMW 320d speedometer
Photo: storem/Flickr


The problem is particularly acute for police in Oslo. Figures from 2010 show the Våleranga tunnel was the most efficient surveillance point, with an average of 11 drivers caught speeding per hour.

However, the camera was turned off regularly, and the number of controlled cars fell by 13 percent last year. Only three people are employed at the police’s Centre for Automatic Traffic Surveillance (ATK) office.

 “We tend to regulate the amount of work when people are off sick for a long time, but it still tends to hit our capacity. Being such a small unit makes us vulnerable,” leader Knut Nysæter tells VG.

There are also fears it may be contagious. Reduced staff at the (ATK) in Hustad means 40 percent of drivers in all of Norway are getting away with it.

Police staff at Hustad are also suffering from more of a long-term problem. The number of traffic surveillance video cameras has been increasing during the last few years in Norway.

“We currently have 25 employees, but it looks like there will be cutbacks. We will have to inform the police districts and state that we cannot take as many cases as we used to. Thus, they either must process cases themselves, or reduce the number of controls,” says Unit manager Kjell Arne Hestad.

Nevertheless, ATK Oslo’s Mr Nysæther informs motorists to remain on their toes.

“All our speed cameras are potentially active from time to time. We have 15 in Oslo and are free to divide our resources on roads where traffic safety is the most important.



Published on Friday, 11th March, 2011 at 07:30 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

This post has the following tags: policespeedcameras, staffillness, automatictrafficcontrols.





  
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