Prostitution law fails victims / News / The Foreigner

Prostitution law fails victims. Police and Ministry of Justice face criticism. Buying sex in Norway has been illegal since the beginning of last year. The Ministry of Justice has given 10 million kroner towards measures to help women out of prostitution, but it’s stopped there. “The scumbags came out when the law was introduced,” 24 year-old “Bea”, who’s been selling sex since she was 15, tells NRK.

prostitutes, human, trafficking, oslo, harassment, customers, kerb-crawlers, law



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Prostitution law fails victims

Published on Tuesday, 2nd March, 2010 at 12:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Police and Ministry of Justice face criticism.

Black boots with high heels
Black boots with high heels
Photo: Tu Foto/Wikimedia Commons


Eerie

Buying sex in Norway has been illegal since the beginning of last year. The Ministry of Justice has given 10 million kroner towards measures to help women out of prostitution, but it’s stopped there.

“The scumbags came out when the law was introduced,” 24 year-old “Bea”, who’s been selling sex since she was 15, tells NRK.

Many customers also wait until girls get desperate enough; almost forcing them to agree to dubious acts.

Police harassment

There are approximately 1,400 prostitutes in Oslo. Many are victims of human trafficking and need trauma treatment. Olav Lægende, General Manager of one of the Church’s City Mission’s (Kirkens bymisjon) centres, is critical to both politicians and the police.

“You aren’t allowed to work in Norway if you’re from Nigeria and are resident in Spain or Italy. We’ve seen police chasing zealously after Nigerian women through the streets at night. It’s quite undignified. They deserve better,” he says.

“Bea” reports the same, saying police seem more interested in bothering and harassing girls, rather than helping them.

Not ideal

Astrid Aas Hansen, State Secretary at the Ministry of Justice, admits things could have been done differently. People behind the human trafficking are still free.

“The ban has reduced the demand for prostitutes, but we haven’t been entirely successful. The ideal would have been to have many measures in place when the law took effect.”

Meanwhile, many prostitutes are still waiting; without alternative ways of earning an income.

“I think it’s silly, because things were talked about so positively before the law came,” says “Bea”.




Published on Tuesday, 2nd March, 2010 at 12:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: prostitutes, human, trafficking, oslo, harassment, customers, kerb-crawlers, law.





  
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