Record sales of pre-prepared Christmas food in Norway / News / The Foreigner

Record sales of pre-prepared Christmas food in Norway. Traditional Norwegian Yuletide meals-in-a-box purchases have taken off since being launched some 14 years ago. Shoppers in Norwegian supermarkets have increasingly been choosing pre-prepared dishes, and niche foods, previous reports have shown. Food wastage is still high. When it comes Christmas fare, however, producer Fjordland reports these have tripled.

norwaychristmas, christmasfoodnorway



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Record sales of pre-prepared Christmas food in Norway

Published on Friday, 29th November, 2013 at 07:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 29th November 2013 at 09:47.

Traditional Norwegian Yuletide meals-in-a-box purchases have taken off since being launched some 14 years ago.

Pork ribs
These are a very popular Christmas dish in eastern Norway, especially. They are traditionally accompanied by sausage, pork with crackling, meat-based cakes, red cabbage, potatoes, and gravy.Pork ribs
Photo: Røed/Wikimedia Commons


Shoppers in Norwegian supermarkets have increasingly been choosing pre-prepared dishes, and niche foods, previous reports have shown. Food wastage is still high.

When it comes Christmas fare, however, producer Fjordland reports these have tripled.

“We sold around 100,000 meals the first years, we estimate this will be 300,000 this year,” the company’s Knud Einar Søyland tells Nationen.

Turkey, dishes with ribbe (pork ribs), mutton (pinnekjøtt), lutfisk (lutefisk), and deserts are all being devoured.

The end of October and up to Christmas Eve is the biggest sales period for Fjordland, according to him.

“Over a third of the rice porridge (risengrinsgrøt) [we produce] is eaten pre-Christmas. [Purchases of] deserts – led by Christmas ones such as creamed rice (riskrem) and strawberry sauce – normally increase 35 per cent in this period,” says Mr Søyland.

“Purchasesof dinners from Fjordland are some 40 per cent higher in the week before Christmas than in a normal week,” he concludes.

Editor's note: Here are some more articles about Christmas food and drink in Norway.




Published on Friday, 29th November, 2013 at 07:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 29th November 2013 at 09:47.

This post has the following tags: norwaychristmas, christmasfoodnorway.





  
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