Religious Christmas goodies come to Norway’s capital / News / The Foreigner

Religious Christmas goodies come to Norway’s capital. Eleven craftsmen and one architect have teamed up to create a gingerbread replica of the Gol Stave Church at Oslo’s Museum of Cultural History. More than 20 kilograms of gingerbread dough and 240 sheets of baking paper were used to build the structure comprised of 190 separate pieces of gingerbread. “Everything lies in the details,” museum craftsman John Wennberg told NRK.

norwaychurches, norwaychristmas



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Religious Christmas goodies come to Norway’s capital

Published on Monday, 18th November, 2013 at 10:37 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 18th November 2013 at 13:50.

Eleven craftsmen and one architect have teamed up to create a gingerbread replica of the Gol Stave Church at Oslo’s Museum of Cultural History.

The gingerbread replica of Gol Stave Church
The gingerbread replica of Gol Stave Church
Photo: Norwegian Museum of Cultural History


More than 20 kilograms of gingerbread dough and 240 sheets of baking paper were used to build the structure comprised of 190 separate pieces of gingerbread.

“Everything lies in the details,” museum craftsman John Wennberg told NRK.

“The architect has had quite a bit of work to do dimensioning all the parts so that they fit together,” he said, adding the gingerbread-real church ratios are 4cm:1m.

This structure required creative thinking. Norwegian Museum of Cultural History staff used a different method for flattening out the gingerbread’s surface.

They replaced the rolling pin with an old tin to smoothen the surface into a perfect thickness.

Moreover, the architect had to take the rising of the dough during the fermentation process into account..

When rolled out into 3.5 millimeters of thickness, the gingerbread would grow up to 5 millimeters after roasting and fermentation.

“There are huge contrasts between gingerbread dough and wood, which is the material craftsmen usually use [to build churches],” stated museum senior curator Terje Planke to NRK.

The gingerbread stave church, complete with woodpecker and dragon figurines, was exhibited on Sunday.

While the public was invited to take part in the museum’s Christmas preparations, the next opportunity to see it will be at their Christmas market.

It takes place on 30 November-01 December and the following weekend. Opening hours are between 11am and 4pm.

Renovation work has just been completed on the original stave church, which dates back to the 1200s.

Being a Medieval church, a museum press spokesperson tells The Foreigner it is likely the dragons on it were inspired by religions other than Christianity.



Published on Monday, 18th November, 2013 at 10:37 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 18th November 2013 at 13:50.

This post has the following tags: norwaychurches, norwaychristmas.





  
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