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Risk of increased terror in Norway. Police Security Service head ardently supports Data Retention Directive. Janne Kristiansen, head of the Police Security Service (PST), strongly advocates Norway adopts the EU’s Data Retention Directive. Despite political and public opposition towards it, she fears the country could be more exposed to terror without the DLD.Active recruitment “It’ll lead to a significantly lower security level here than the rest of Europe, and make our work considerably more difficult if Norway remains without it. We are part of Europe, which is one area when it comes to terror,” she tells Aftenposten.

eu, data, retention, directive, resistance, protests, political, parties, knut, storberget, helga, pedersen, georg, apenes, eea, janne, kristiansen, police, security, service, pst,



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Risk of increased terror in Norway

Published on Tuesday, 13th April, 2010 at 08:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 13th April 2010 at 09:55.

Police Security Service head ardently supports Data Retention Directive.

Police Security Service (PST) 2006
Police Security Service (PST) 2006
Photo: Penneknekt/Wikimedia Commons


Janne Kristiansen, head of the Police Security Service (PST), strongly advocates Norway adopts the EU’s Data Retention Directive. Despite political and public opposition towards it, she fears the country could be more exposed to terror without the DLD.

Active recruitment

“It’ll lead to a significantly lower security level here than the rest of Europe, and make our work considerably more difficult if Norway remains without it. We are part of Europe, which is one area when it comes to terror,” she tells Aftenposten.

Kristiansen has already expressed her concerns over increased recruitment of Norwegian youths by known terrorist organisations, and places responsibility for any negative consequences resulting from its non-introduction firmly with the politicians.

The PST’s own threat assessment has also revealed radical Islam is gaining a foothold, posing a risk of terrorist activity.

Sidelines

Janne Kristiansen, Head of PST
Janne Kristiansen, Head of PST
PST/Flickr
As another argument, Kristiansen claims Norway already remains uninvolved internationally regarding the free flow of evidence system between EU countries.

“Norway is already referred to by leading European politicians and judicial authorities as a free state in Europe due to a lack of harmonisation between Norwegian and European laws,” says Kristiansen.

The country has also failed to implement the European arrest warrant introduced seven years ago, which has a lower extradition threshold for suspects.

“If we don’t adopt the DRD, the Free State of Norway could become a fact. And if that happens, we risk an influx level of criminals we’ve never experienced before.”

Misleading

IKT Norge’s Torgeir Waterhouse claims Kristiansen hasn’t revealed all the facts about the DRD. Neither the PST’s submission, nor any interviews with her contain what she alleges.

And the directive only applies to E-Com services, meaning traffic between services outside the DLD’s operational area isn’t recorded.

“2.5 million Norwegians use Facebook, and interactive chat is Directive-exempt. The same applies to G-mail and other popular services such as Skype. Skype accounts for 13 percent of the cross-border traffic,” Waterhouse tells NRK.

Implausible

He goes on to say this provides huge loopholes for criminal and/or terrorist groups to exploit. Thus, the DRD’s function of uncovering and recording serious Internet-based crime, and travelling to Norway to engage in it, is pointless.

Waterhouse believes calling Norway a free state for criminals is far-fetched, especially as several EU countries have resisted introducing the directive themselves.

Romania didn’t initiate it in October 2009 because it was regarded as unconstitutional.

Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger
Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger
Emdee/Wikimedia Commons
The same decision was reached by a Constitutional Court in Germany at the beginning of last month. The court also ruled all information that has been collected an stored on the basis of the directive had to be deleted

Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger, the German Free Democratic Party’s (FDP) Minister of Justice, welcomed their finding.

“This ruling will spread beyond Europe,” NTB reports her as saying.




Published on Tuesday, 13th April, 2010 at 08:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 13th April 2010 at 09:55.

This post has the following tags: eu, data, retention, directive, resistance, protests, political, parties, knut, storberget, helga, pedersen, georg, apenes, eea, janne, kristiansen, police, security, service, pst, .





  
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