Russia, extreme Islamism pose risks to Norway / News / The Foreigner

Russia, extreme Islamism pose risks to Norway. The Norwegian Police Security Service (PST) highlights several perils in their annual threat assessment. Officials believe that Norway’s defence, emergency preparedness, critical infrastructure – especially the energy sector – as well as political decision-making processes are amongst targets that are particularly vulnerable to espionage, data manipulation, and sabotage. Several foreign powers’ services with interests in Norway have devoted considerable resources to developing digital espionage capacity in recent years, says the PST.  

threats, security, russia, extremists, espionage, spying, computers, internet, terrorism, paywall



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Russia, extreme Islamism pose risks to Norway

Published on Wednesday, 1st February, 2017 at 18:06 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The Norwegian Police Security Service (PST) highlights several perils in their annual threat assessment.

A laptop keyboard (illustration photo)
A laptop keyboard (illustration photo)
Photo: Declan Jewell/Flickr


Officials believe that Norway’s defence, emergency preparedness, critical infrastructure – especially the energy sector – as well as political decision-making processes are amongst targets that are particularly vulnerable to espionage, data manipulation, and sabotage.

Several foreign powers’ services with interests in Norway have devoted considerable resources to developing digital espionage capacity in recent years, says the PST.  

Norwegian security personnel also state that Russian and Chinese players have tried to compromise computer systems belonging to Norwegian businesses that manage basic national values and major commercial interests.

Moreover, several nations have intelligence personnel in Norway. Many of them operate disguised as diplomatic or consular staff, as well as businesspersons or employees.

“Norway and Norwegian interests will be exposed to foreign intelligence activities [in 2017] that could potentially cause major damage. Foreign services deploy both advanced computer network-based operations and traditional methods against Norwegian targets,” writes the PST.

Russia is pointed out as being the main country having both the intention of, and capacity to conduct intelligence operations that could cause major harm regarding the Scandinavian country and her interests.

Other nations’ services also pose a threat to Norwegian interests “in different contexts”, with people in charge of bilateral relations with countries such as Russia and China being targets for various intelligence agencies’ operations.

According to the PST, extreme Islamism still poses the greatest terror threat to Norway and 2017 could see a terrorist attack at home.

The most serious threat of terror this year is considered to be connected to ISIL (Islamic State of Iraq and The Levant) and al-Qaida (AQ).

While both consider Norway as being “a legitimate, but non-priority target for terrorism”, new calls from both organisations to carry out attacks in the West “will still win support amongst supporters in Norway,” states the PST.

“Acts of terrorism in other Western countries could inspire people in Norway to carry out similar actions here,” they conclude.

Other points contained in the security service’s annual assessment for 2017 include:

  • 2017’s general election will likely mean increased threats against authorities
  • New intelligence operations conducted against Norwegian technology firms (including military) and opponents of foreign regimes (including Iran) who are living in exile in Norway are likely
  • Espionage regarding Norway’s strategic location regarding the High North and the Arctic
  • Military facilities and installations particularly relevant for Russian security, as well as Norway’s defence capacity in the vicinity of Russia are particularly vulnerable to spying – this includes NATO cooperation, Norwegian naval activities, and Norwegian intelligence installations


Published on Wednesday, 1st February, 2017 at 18:06 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: threats, security, russia, extremists, espionage, spying, computers, internet, terrorism, paywall.





  
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