Sale of light bulbs to cease / News / The Foreigner

Sale of light bulbs to cease. European-wide ban to take effect shortly. From 01 September, consumers will not be able to buy traditional light bulbs any more. It’s out with the old and in with the new.Energy-saving The ban is coming into effect because 80 percent of energy used by the current bulbs goes to producing warmth, whilst only 20 percent is used on lighting, according to NRK. The new type turns this ratio back to front, with a new 11W energy-saving bulb giving the same effect as the old 60W.

light, bulb, energy, saving, expensive, cold, harsh, environment, lower, bills, higher, costs



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Sale of light bulbs to cease

Published on Wednesday, 26th August, 2009 at 18:34 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 8th September 2009 at 11:05.

European-wide ban to take effect shortly.

Bulb
Bulb
Photo: Arthur Ng Heng Kui/Shutterstock Images


From 01 September, consumers will not be able to buy traditional light bulbs any more. It’s out with the old and in with the new.

Energy-saving

The ban is coming into effect because 80 percent of energy used by the current bulbs goes to producing warmth, whilst only 20 percent is used on lighting, according to NRK. The new type turns this ratio back to front, with a new 11W energy-saving bulb giving the same effect as the old 60W.

Consumers will also be able to choose between halogen and LED bulbs, saving 30 percent and 80 percent energy respectively, although the lighting may be harsher and colder than before.

Three years to go

The ban is progressive. From next week, bulbs with a matt finish will disappear from the shelves, together with prohibiting the production, import, and sales of 100W clear finish bulbs – although shops will be allowed to use up existing stock.

In 2010, shoppers will have to wave goodbye to the 75W, continuing down the wattages to 25, which will fade in 2012.

Give a little, take a little

Although people will save money on their electricity bills, with the new bulbs also lasting longer, they will cost more to buy. Colours were less vivid with many of the energy-saving bulbs that NRK tested too.

The experts tell consumers to make sure they match the bulb type to the lighting use that it’s required for – for example, choosing the ordinary energy-saving bulbs for normal use, and to use halogen bulbs over the bathroom mirror. Above all, if in doubt, ask for advice in the shop.

The only other alternative will be to sit in the dark.




Published on Wednesday, 26th August, 2009 at 18:34 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 8th September 2009 at 11:05.

This post has the following tags: light, bulb, energy, saving, expensive, cold, harsh, environment, lower, bills, higher, costs.





  
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