Scandinavia’s oldest snow patch find discovered in Norway / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Scandinavia’s oldest snow patch find discovered in Norway. Two Norwegians’ discovery surprises archaeological experts and sets a possible record. Tord Bretten and Line B. Aukrust found the fragments of the five Neolithic arrowshafts and a Neolithic longbow in August 2011 in the central Norway’s Dovrefjell mountain range. Their discoveries are estimated to be around 5,400 years old. “These discoveries are the oldest in Scandinavia as far as we know,” Martin Callanan at NTNU’s (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Department of Archaeology and Religious Studies tells The Foreigner.

climatechange, norwayarchaeology



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Scandinavia’s oldest snow patch find discovered in Norway

Published on Thursday, 5th September, 2013 at 10:24 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 18th September 2013 at 09:29.

Two Norwegians’ discovery surprises archaeological experts and sets a possible record.



Tord Bretten and Line B. Aukrust found the fragments of the five Neolithic arrowshafts and a Neolithic longbow in August 2011 in the central Norway’s Dovrefjell mountain range. Their discoveries are estimated to be around 5,400 years old.

“These discoveries are the oldest in Scandinavia as far as we know,” Martin Callanan at NTNU’s (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Department of Archaeology and Religious Studies tells The Foreigner.

“The people who found them are collectors who work in cooperation with the museum. One of them has been collecting things for over 30 years.”

Calling the “a lovely piece of work”, Mr Callanan explains, “We don’t often get to see the wooden parts of Stone Age artefacts. We often find arrowheads but the way the shaft is preserved is rather unique. That’s what makes snow patch archaeology so exciting.”

According to him, those who used the discovered weapons were hunters.

“It appears to be reindeer that was the main prey at that time. In Norway, these animals gather on snow patches.”

At the same time, Mr Callanan believes something could be happening to the climate for these items to have been found.

“This may indicate that there has not been the same amount of melting the last 5000 years”, he remarked to NRK, adding, “something new is happening.”



Published on Thursday, 5th September, 2013 at 10:24 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 18th September 2013 at 09:29.

This post has the following tags: climatechange, norwayarchaeology.





  
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