Screaming children cause hearing damage / News / The Foreigner

Screaming children cause hearing damage. Children with loud screams are seldom popular even/especially with their parents. As education and health officials voice concern, Norwegian day care staff injures their hearing. Trondheim pre-school teacher Solveig Aune received a pierced eardrum two years ago after picking a child up to comfort it. “This was a child with a particularly powerful voice”, the 29-year-old tells NRK two years later, “then I felt something happen inside my ear that. I didn’t think it was so serious to being with so I waited a while with going to the doctor. I’ve got a hearing injury.”

norwaypre-schools, screamingchildren, hearingdamage



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Screaming children cause hearing damage

Published on Friday, 2nd November, 2012 at 15:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Children with loud screams are seldom popular even/especially with their parents. As education and health officials voice concern, Norwegian day care staff injures their hearing.

Musicians' ear plugs (illustration photo)
Musicians' ear plugs (illustration photo)
Photo: Light current/Wikimedia Commons


Trondheim pre-school teacher Solveig Aune received a pierced eardrum two years ago after picking a child up to comfort it.

“This was a child with a particularly powerful voice”, the 29-year-old tells NRK two years later, “then I felt something happen inside my ear that. I didn’t think it was so serious to being with so I waited a while with going to the doctor. I’ve got a hearing injury.”

Day care staff has reported 87 injuries to Norway’s Labour Inspection Authority since 2006. 31 of them are noise-related.

Education union representative Hege Valås says employee hearing damage there is not unheard of, “but is mostly connected to long-term noise exposure. It affects people who have worked in pre-school for many years surrounded by sound every working day.”

“It’s seldom we hear of noise-relate episodes as serious as this one, but there’s no doubt noise is a problem for both the employees and children in a nursery,” she says.

80.7 decibels – equivalent to a busy road – was the average noise-level in pre-school institutions, measurements carried out by private nursery organisation PBL show.

They recommend dimming the lights as one possible measure for getting levels down. 

This is well known to chicken farmers as a method for decrease food consumption and preventing pecking, according to the broadcaster.

“I worked in a department where there were many small children”, Solveig Aune explains. “The child I comforted was a one-year-old in the process of getting used to being in pre-school.”

“Children of that age are particularly prone to crying more than normal at autumn time,” she concludes, saying she and her colleagues have now started using earplugs as protection.



Published on Friday, 2nd November, 2012 at 15:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwaypre-schools, screamingchildren, hearingdamage.





  
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