Shoppers shun organic food / News / The Foreigner

Shoppers shun organic food. Updated: Norwegians appear to be more concerned about their pockets than health at the supermarket and have lost their taste for organic food. Production and promotional campaigns have increased, but sales have more than halved. “There are not many fans of organic produce in Norway. Many are positive when answering questionnaires, but don’t seem to follow through in the shops,” says Per Roskifte, Director for Community Relations at NorgesGruppen.

organicfood, norgesgruppen, norwegianfarming



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Shoppers shun organic food

Published on Tuesday, 19th April, 2011 at 09:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 19th April 2011 at 20:10.

Updated: Norwegians appear to be more concerned about their pockets than health at the supermarket and have lost their taste for organic food.

Blonde Acquitaine cow (illus. ph.)
Blonde Acquitaine cow (illus. ph.)
Photo: Myrabella/Wikimedia Commons


Production and promotional campaigns have increased, but sales have more than halved.

“There are not many fans of organic produce in Norway. Many are positive when answering questionnaires, but don’t seem to follow through in the shops,” says Per Roskifte, Director for Community Relations at NorgesGruppen.

Milk, eggs, meat, and possibly vegetables are losing ground in the supermarkets, representatives from three of the four main grocery retailers in Norway tell Nationen.

“Organic produce is more expensive, which could be one factor affecting sales. Many customers also view conventionally-farmed foods as being more than satisfactory,” Mr Roskifte says.

Rema 1000 and Coop also report declining demand. The total sales value of 2011’s Q1 organic fruit and vegetables sank by four percent in comparison to the same period last year.

Apart from higher supermarket prices, reduced appetites for organic produce are also a problem for producers and suppliers, who have to foot the bill for overproduction.  Several have had to sell at a loss, or throw unsold goods away.

“I transported 10 tons of organic potatoes to be packed as ordinary-priced ones last week, costing me 30,000 kroner,” one farmer tells the paper.

Meat and dairy farmer-owned cooperatives NorgĂĄrden (Nortura) and Tine have also lost out. Nortura has disclosed an eight percent drop, and 30 million litres of organic milk last year cost Tine 20 million kroner.

“There used to be a need to stimulate the production of organic milk to ensure there were enough raw ingredients to meet the expected demand, but the imbalance has now become a challenge and cannot last for long,” says Tine’s communications manager, Lars Galtung.



Published on Tuesday, 19th April, 2011 at 09:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 19th April 2011 at 20:10.

This post has the following tags: organicfood, norgesgruppen, norwegianfarming.


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