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The Foreigner Sjursøya train crash family to sue. Surviving son alleges procedures weren’t followed. More details and consequences emerge as the days go by after Wednesday’s runaway train disaster that killed three people, and injured a further three at Sjursøya.Still clueless Accident investigators and authorities still don’t have all the answers. But track manager Per Herman Sørlie believes hydraulic rail brakes at the Alnabru loading/unloading terminal had either somehow been released, or weren’t engaged in the first place.

oslo, alnabru, sjusoeya, train, disaster, wreck, cargonet



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Sjursøya train crash family to sue

Published on Friday, 26th March, 2010 at 15:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Surviving son alleges procedures weren’t followed.



More details and consequences emerge as the days go by after Wednesday’s runaway train disaster that killed three people, and injured a further three at Sjursøya.

Still clueless

Accident investigators and authorities still don’t have all the answers. But track manager Per Herman Sørlie believes hydraulic rail brakes at the Alnabru loading/unloading terminal had either somehow been released, or weren’t engaged in the first place.

“We can’t comment about the accident, but haven’t found anything suggesting the brakes failed in any way,” he tells NRK, saying they’re designed to hold goods trains of up to 1,000 tons.

As well as crashing through several sets of track-mounted brakes, the wagons also ended up on the wrong track.

And the so-called track barrier which the train dispatcher used to try and switch the points, putting the wagons on a different set of lines, had sheared off. It was found 60 metres away in a dam, after having gone through a fence.

Lawsuit

Police have released the names of those who died. Amongst the victims was 65-year-old Leif Kåre Nordmo, who was working in the terminal building hit and demolished by the goods wagons.

His son Leif Erik Nordmo (35) claims the accident never would have happened if the predefined procedures had been followed properly.

Nordmo tells Dagsavisen he believes the heads of CargoNet and the National Rail Administration (Jernbaneverket) should adhere to these as part of their daily routine. He says he’s planning to sue.

“I’m going to follow this matter up and, if necessary, push it through the courts at my own expense so that those responsible have to pay a sum they’ll always remember.”

Meanwhile, Tor Erik Skarpen, the National Rail Administration’s Information Director, says one of the big questions is how the wagons managed to roll out of the Alnabru terminal in the first place.

“This is something the police and accident investigation committee will have to find out. We will, of course, help find out who’s responsible for this happening,” he says.

The other victims were Cato Kyrre Breistrand (born, 1952), and Geir Atle Lind (born, 1961).

Police also say the person feared missing was one of the three who were killed.



Published on Friday, 26th March, 2010 at 15:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: oslo, alnabru, sjusoeya, train, disaster, wreck, cargonet.





  
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