Skepticism grows to Lofoten oil following Gulf of Mexico disaster / News / The Foreigner

Skepticism grows to Lofoten oil following Gulf of Mexico disaster. Experts and environmentalists warn of consequences. Next week sees a hearing about the government’s management plan about oil boring off Lofoten and Vesterålen. The ongoing Gulf of Mexico (GoM) deepwater oil well disaster has raised the question of a veto once again. Bellona alleges they have documentation showing evidence of several major incidents on the Norwegian Continental Shelf similar to the ones that have hit BP.

lofoten, mexico, gulf, deepwater, horizon, oil, rig, disaster, labour, socialist, left, conservative, christian, democratic, progress, liberal, party



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Skepticism grows to Lofoten oil following Gulf of Mexico disaster

Published on Friday, 4th June, 2010 at 09:18 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Experts and environmentalists warn of consequences.

New Harbor Island oil containment boom
New Harbor Island oil containment boom
Photo: U.S. Navy/Wikimedia Commons


Evidence

Next week sees a hearing about the government’s management plan about oil boring off Lofoten and Vesterålen. The ongoing Gulf of Mexico (GoM) deepwater oil well disaster has raised the question of a veto once again.

Bellona alleges they have documentation showing evidence of several major incidents on the Norwegian Continental Shelf similar to the ones that have hit BP.

Leader Frederic Hauge tells Dagens Næringsliv (DN) Statoil’s recent Gullfaks C well incident is just one example.

The organisation says it plans to present what they have at the hearing, and think the GoM situation should be taken into consideration.

Friends of the Earth Norway (Naturvernforbundet) argue the seriousness of the GoM catastrophe should have an impact on today’s oil industry, and have demanded all deep boring should cease.

Ignoring public opinion

Labour (Ap), on the other hand, seems split on the issue of Lofoten for now, and says it might also consider giving in to SV’s (the Socialist Left Party, part of the red-green tri-party coalition government) demands for a veto.

Meanwhile, the Christian Democrats (Krf) would rather the government decide to extract more oil from existing reservoirs instead of opening the area up.

This leaves only the Conservative (H) and Progress (FrP) Parties who are in favour of drilling.

Eirin Sund, Labour’s environmental and energy political spokesperson, tells Stavanger Aftenblad she believes events in the GoM will be important when a decision about boring is to be made in the future.

She criticises the two remaining parties for not listening to what the people say about the area’s vulnerability.

“The Conservative and Progress Parties, who have already demanded there be oil boring, must be feeling embarrassed now. They are, in any case, definitely on a collision course with the Norwegian Peoples’ common sense which indicates we must be very careful here,” she says.

Impact

Oil boring off Lofoten and Vesterålen is a key issue for environment-friendly SV.

SV’s Environment Minister, Erik Solheim, who was recently given a report about the impact of oil activity on the region, said at the time he considered it to be risky.

“The probability of accidents related to ship traffic or petroleum activity is estimated to be low, but their impact on the environment and society could be significant.”

Consequences

Chairman of the North Energy Company in Northern Norway, Johan Petter Barlindhaug, thinks the GoM catastrophe will lead to stricter rules regarding deepwater drilling.

“It’s clearly much easier to deal with a water depth of 400 metres than a depth of 1,500. One should also keep the dangers of high reservoir pressure in mind, such as what happened regarding the problem Statoil had with Gullfaks. I believe the consequences will be a significant tightening of the rules. At the same time, every company will probably be extra cautious now following this accident,” he tells DN.

11 people were killed, and several others were seriously injured after an explosion on Transocean’s Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico on 20 April.

Two days later, the rig sank, releasing what US authorities believe to be up to 120 million litres of oil into the Gulf.

The PSA (Petroleum Safety Authority) says it’s now set up a workgroup to investigate how accidents like the one to have hit the rig could possibly be avoided on the Norwegian Continental Shelf in the future.



Published on Friday, 4th June, 2010 at 09:18 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: lofoten, mexico, gulf, deepwater, horizon, oil, rig, disaster, labour, socialist, left, conservative, christian, democratic, progress, liberal, party.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!