Sámi artists compete in Europe / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Sámi artists compete in Europe. The Liet International European Minority Language Song Contest sees ten bands from different regions gathering in Germany’s Oldenburg, Lower Saxony. Performing their songs in regional and minority languages, Friday, contestants from different regions in Europe will compete for the prize. The song contest’s existence is to raise awareness of Europe’s endangered languages and to help keep them alive.

sami, finland, competition, music, songs



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Sámi artists compete in Europe

Published on Friday, 12th December, 2014 at 10:43 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

The Liet International European Minority Language Song Contest sees ten bands from different regions gathering in Germany’s Oldenburg, Lower Saxony.



Performing their songs in regional and minority languages, Friday, contestants from different regions in Europe will compete for the prize.

The song contest’s existence is to raise awareness of Europe’s endangered languages and to help keep them alive.

The Council of Europe sponsors the event in connection with its Charter for Regional or Minority Languages.

One of the groups performing is the Aila Duo. The female artists will be singing in Aanaar (Inari, in Norwegian) Sámi. Only some 350 people in the northernmost part of Finland speak this language.

Carmina Burana composer Carl Orff’s and German educator Gunild Keetman’s love of music brought Heli Aikio and Jessika Lampi together to form the Aila Duo.

Orff often used instruments such as the xylophone in his works. This is one of the instruments that the female artists have spent years experimenting with as part of the music they perform, according to the song contest’s organisers.

Combining the xylophone with local and even self-built instruments like the 5-stringed and 11-stringed kantele, and the Sámi drum, makes this a very special performance at Liet International, organisers say.

The kantele is considered to be the oldest instrument in Finnish folk music and is played by plucking the strings. It is part of the dulcimer and zither family native to Finland and the northern Europe area of Karelia – Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865-1957) composed a work called the Karelia Suite.

This year’s 10th edition of the Liet International festival will also see ensembles singing in Breton (a Celtic language spoken in Brittany), Frisian – a generic term for a closely related group of three Germanic languages – and Gaelic.

Gaelic is a linguistic group that is one of the two branches of the Insular Celtic languages, including Irish, Manx, and Scottish Gaelic.

Other languages that will be sung in are:

  • Galician-Asturian – a set of dialects found in the regions of Asturia and Galicia in Spain.
  • Ladin – a group of dialects mainly spoken in Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, South Tyrol, Trentino, and the province of Belluno.
  • Low German – a West Germanic language spoken mainly in northern Germany and the eastern part of the Netherlands descended from Old Saxon in its earliest form.
  • Mari – belonging to the Uralic language family and spoken by about 400,000 people.
  • Minderico – spoken by a bilingual group of people in Portugal who also speak Portuguese.
  • Sardinian – a Romance language spoken by about 75 per cent of the inhabitants on Italy’s Sardinia Island.

The Liet International Competition was first organised in 2002 and held in Leeuwarden,the capital of Friesland in Holland – the city also hosted the event in 2009.

In 2006, the festival began to travel across Europe, gaining media attention and becoming one of the biggest events for the promotion of minority languages, say organisers.

The contest has also taken place in Sweden’s Luleå (2008), France’s Lorient (2010), Italy’s Friuli (2011), and Gijón/Xixón in Spain (2012).  

Performing in English is banned at the competition.

"It's a huge misnomer that all contemporary music should be in English. Every year we get confirmation that this minority language music deserves attention and that it is a worthwhile and interesting event,” said Onno Falkena, coordinator of the Liet International Competition in 2011.

(Additional source: Wikipedia).




Published on Friday, 12th December, 2014 at 10:43 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: sami, finland, competition, music, songs.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!