Stavanger council to vaccinate pregnant women / News / The Foreigner

Stavanger council to vaccinate pregnant women. Head of queue for Influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. First batches to arrive next week. Earlier fears of Swine Flu pandemic in Norway have so far been unfounded but Stavanger council say they are going to proceed as planned.Risk The council has confirmed that it is to put its vaccination programme for women who are pregnant into effect.

swine, flu, influenza, a, h1n1, stavanger, council, vaccination, programme, institute, public, health, norwegian, pregnant, women, risk



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Stavanger council to vaccinate pregnant women

Published on Wednesday, 7th October, 2009 at 09:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Head of queue for Influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. First batches to arrive next week.

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Photo: Ingve/Flickr


Earlier fears of Swine Flu pandemic in Norway have so far been unfounded but Stavanger council say they are going to proceed as planned.

Risk

The council has confirmed that it is to put its vaccination programme for women who are pregnant into effect.

“All pregnant women are to be vaccinated anyway,” Egil Bjørløw, head of the council’s health department tells The Foreigner.

The vaccine is to be given primarily to those in their second or third trimester, but the Norwegian Institute of Public Health acknowledges that there is a small risk with taking it.

“Pregnant women have a higher risk of becoming seriously ill from the Swine Flu. We have a long tradition of not vaccinating those who are pregnant unless it is absolutely necessary...but believe the risk is so minimal, that there is a clear advantage to being vaccinated,” the institute’s chief doctor Bjørn Iversen told NRK on Monday.

A pregnant woman in her 30s from Oslo died at the University Hospital on Sunday after having contracted the Influenza A virus.

Decline

Though the number of reported cases has decreased lately – dipping slightly below the qualifying limit for an epidemic – Bjørløw says the council is taking no chances.

“We believe that an outbreak of Swine Flu will come simultaneously with the ordinary seasonal influenza between November and February, and plan to use community centres, health stations, and gym halls should mass vaccination be necessary.”

Next week’s 300,000 doses will be distributed evenly over the country within a period of 14 days after approval by the Norwegian Medicines Agency. All councils will receive their allotted batches simultaneously.

Health personnel and other high-risk groups have also been prioritised.



Published on Wednesday, 7th October, 2009 at 09:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: swine, flu, influenza, a, h1n1, stavanger, council, vaccination, programme, institute, public, health, norwegian, pregnant, women, risk.





  
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