Stavanger’s culture hit by new licensing laws / News / The Foreigner

Stavanger’s culture hit by new licensing laws. Liquidity under threat from reduced alcohol sales. In 2008 Stavanger’s licensing committee voted to allow extended opening hours for places that have various types of cultural arrangements. Under Wednesday’s meeting, the scheme was annulled.Negative reactions Their decision means that the affected venues will either have to become pubs that are open all day, but having to close at 01:30 or nightclubs, that will not be able to open before 22:00 and have to close at 03:30. The nightclubs with many stages will not be allowed to offer any cultural arrangements. This doesn’t strike a chord with a couple of the venues affected.

stavanger, licensing, laws, culture, alcohol, committee



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Stavanger’s culture hit by new licensing laws

Published on Thursday, 30th April, 2009 at 22:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 5th June 2009 at 00:41.

Liquidity under threat from reduced alcohol sales.

Guitar
Guitar
Photo: GWImages/Shutterstock Images


A one-year experiment

In 2008 Stavanger’s licensing committee voted to allow extended opening hours for places that have various types of cultural arrangements. Under Wednesday’s meeting, the scheme was annulled.

Negative reactions

Their decision means that the affected venues will either have to become pubs that are open all day, but having to close at 01:30 or nightclubs, that will not be able to open before 22:00 and have to close at 03:30. The nightclubs with many stages will not be allowed to offer any cultural arrangements. This doesn’t strike a chord with a couple of the venues affected.

“We feared this would happen. It’s sad, but not unexpected”, Tom Håkon Brekke, the general manager of Checkpoint Charlie tells The Foreigner.

“It’s understandable, but disappointing nonetheless” says Tou Scene’s general manager, Per Arne Alstad.

Nobody’s a winner

Being forced to close earlier than before means they will sell less alcohol. This in turn will lead to a poorer choice of events on offer to the public.

“As people go out late, this will reduce the number of hours we can sell beer. This means we’ll have less money to finance our programme” says Alstad.

From 01 July Checkpoint Charlie, an important arena for Stavanger’s rock milieu, will be offering fewer concerts. Cementen will be decreasing the number of both concerts and stand-up shows.

“Everyone will lose as a result of this; the venues, the public, and the people who both work in and produce the entertainment”, Brekke points out.

Reason

So why did the committee decide to alter them? Alstad has a theory.

“The scheme was meant for places that are serious about offering culture. Unfortunately, it was abused by too many others.”

Incongruous

Brekke thinks their decision is a bit of a paradox in light of the fact that Stavanger was European Capital of Culture last year.

“Stavanger wants to offer culture and entertainment, but the new licensing laws won’t allow there to be as much as before.”

Amongst other places affected by the new laws are Folken and Sting Nere.




Published on Thursday, 30th April, 2009 at 22:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 5th June 2009 at 00:41.

This post has the following tags: stavanger, licensing, laws, culture, alcohol, committee.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!