Swedish Viking heritage withdrawal stymies Norway efforts / News / The Foreigner

Swedish Viking heritage withdrawal stymies Norway efforts. Norway is working with all Nordic countries, Germany, and Latvia to have Viking history inscribed on UNESCO's world heritage list. Efforts are postponed after Sweden withdrew their cooperation. ‘Viking Age Sites’ have been going since 2008, hoping to submit an application in 2013. Sweden’s withdrawal means hopes are now for 2015, however. Sweden has dropped out because the candidate was trading center Birka, which is already on the World Heritage List. The International Steering Committee nevertheless recommended continuing with the nominations.

norwayvikings, unescoworldheritage



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Swedish Viking heritage withdrawal stymies Norway efforts

Published on Saturday, 25th May, 2013 at 19:45 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last Updated on 25th May 2013 at 22:34.

Norway is working with all Nordic countries, Germany, and Latvia to have Viking history inscribed on UNESCO's world heritage list. Efforts are postponed after Sweden withdrew their cooperation.

A typical Swedish Hälsingegård colour
A typical Swedish Hälsingegård colour
Photo: Tove Andersson


‘Viking Age Sites’ have been going since 2008, hoping to submit an application in 2013. Sweden’s withdrawal means hopes are now for 2015, however.

Sweden has dropped out because the candidate was trading center Birka, which is already on the World Heritage List. The International Steering Committee nevertheless recommended continuing with the nominations.

Norway has long been surpassed by Sweden, with its 15 world heritage places. The latest are the seven Hälsingegårder (decorated farms) in Sweden, farmsteads with spectacular paintings, painted wallpaper, details, and interiors demonstrating that farmers wanted to show off their prosperity.

Swedish Culture Minister Lena Adelsohn Liljeroth opened thevisitor center for Hälsingegårder in Järvsö today.

“We celebrate that we are living in a free, democratic country, the Minister said. “The US has 23, we have 15,” she added, emphasizing the work behind this. People have to open their doors to tourists. At the same time, the Hëlsingegård are not only for tourists as people actually live there.

Nearby the visitor’s center is “The large Hälsingegårders way", an adventurous route along highway 50 in Norrland. It gives people the opportunity to experience the selected Hälsing Farms, with their magnificent ballrooms. The road runs through a great millennial cultural landscape.

Norway’s new contenders for the World Heritage List, industry places Rjukan/Notodden and Odda/Tyssedal, are also postponed due to complex conservation issues in both, especially in Odda.

The number of World Heritage places in the Nordic Countries is 33. Sweden is on top, followed by Norway. The oil-rich nation’s World Heritage sites consist of six. The first two Norwegian sites to be voted on to the list were Bryggen in Bergen and Urnes stave church, both of which were elected in 1979. Mining Town Røros was entered on the World Heritage List in 1980, having 333 years of continuous mining and farming, together with wooden buildings from 1600-1700 that are unique.

Sweden’s farms were open to visitors on the May 24 inauguration day, with many offering bed & breakfast in rural surroundings throughout the year. 52 Hälsingegårder welcomed visitors and showed life on the farms. Gästgivars is one of them, with original wallpaper painted by Swedish artist Jonas Wallström in the 1800s. The pattern is now seen in modern homes. Moreover, farms that are not World heritage material, such as Karl, an unpainted farm with a tour just outside Järvsö, is worth visiting.

The farms usually consisted of a main house with several wings, and contained either a special room or an entire building to be used solely for entertaining (called a Herrstuga). The houses were painted dark red using pigment from nearby copper mines and had elaborately carved and painted front entrances. Today, the red farmhouse has come to symbolize the ideal Swedish country life.



Published on Saturday, 25th May, 2013 at 19:45 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last updated on 25th May 2013 at 22:34.

This post has the following tags: norwayvikings, unescoworldheritage.





  
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