Toad puts Norway road officials in the hole / News / The Foreigner

Toad puts Norway road officials in the hole. A sculptor’s work is causing Public Road Administration (NPRA) personnel a large headache amongst road safety concerns. The 2.5 metre high toad sculpture (over 8 feet) was due to be placed in a layby in mid-Norway’s Volda municipality. Austefjorden, in Møre og Romsdal County, reportedly has Europe’s largest documented population of the amphibious Anura order.

norwaysculptures, norwayroads



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Toad puts Norway road officials in the hole

Published on Tuesday, 18th June, 2013 at 10:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 18th June 2013 at 14:16.

A sculptor’s work is causing Public Road Administration (NPRA) personnel a large headache amongst road safety concerns.

Robert Steinnes with his toad sculpture
Robert Steinnes with his toad sculpture
Photo: With kind permission of Robert Steinnes


The 2.5 metre high toad sculpture (over 8 feet) was due to be placed in a layby in mid-Norway’s Volda municipality.

Austefjorden, in Møre og Romsdal County, reportedly has Europe’s largest documented population of the amphibious Anura order.

This section of road is on the E39 motorway stretch running from Volda to Røros, Sør-Trøndelag County.

The (NPRA/Vegvesenet) has now decided locals have to alter plans for the 8 metre by 8 metre (some 26 feet by 26 feet) sculpture, originally planned placed outside a tunnel on Kvisvegen.

“We’re concerned motorists might stray into the path of oncoming traffic or about the possibility of rear-end collisions as they pass and/or slow down to look at it,” the NPRA’s Kåre Mittet tells The Foreigner.

“The sculpture would have been located beside a curve, which, far more seriously, could have meant people driving might hit the tunnel wall,” he adds.

According to Mr Mittet, objects that can be seen from the road require the Authority’s approval.

“We’re also very strict about allowing commercial posters. Speeds of 30 km/h are one thing, but 50-60 km/h is quite another. There were similar issues regarding trolls near the road further south in Hunderfossen Park in Lillehammer.”

“I would have liked it to be placed at its original location, as it would have been near the tunnel built to preserve the toad population,” sculptor Robert Steinnes says.

Picture to come.



Published on Tuesday, 18th June, 2013 at 10:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 18th June 2013 at 14:16.

This post has the following tags: norwaysculptures, norwayroads.





  
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