Union attacks new ‘lightweight’ talent education scheme / News / The Foreigner

Union attacks new ‘lightweight’ talent education scheme. Norway’s egalitarian school system if being challenged by moves to allow musically talented children access to teaching at a higher level. The policy, designed offer improved possibilities for those top of their class, invites students to attend classes meant for older children. In practise, this means secondary school children would be able to attend 6th-Form college classes early, and allow those in 6th-Form to attend university level classes. Union of Education (Utdanningsforbundet) leader Terje Vilno is critical of the move, arguing that, “it’s a good intention to challenge the best.”

kristinhalvorsen, norwegianeducationminister, oslo, talenteducationscheme



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Union attacks new ‘lightweight’ talent education scheme

Published on Monday, 22nd August, 2011 at 16:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 23rd August 2011 at 15:50.

Norway’s egalitarian school system if being challenged by moves to allow musically talented children access to teaching at a higher level.

Steinway Model D
Steinway Model D
Photo: Etincelles/Wikimedia Commons


The policy, designed offer improved possibilities for those top of their class, invites students to attend classes meant for older children. In practise, this means secondary school children would be able to attend 6th-Form college classes early, and allow those in 6th-Form to attend university level classes.

Union of Education (Utdanningsforbundet) leader Terje Vilno is critical of the move, arguing that, “it’s a good intention to challenge the best.”

“Nevertheless, singling out those at the top of their class and giving them separate tuition violates the Education Act,” he says to Aftenposten.

A record number of Norwegian parents are applying to the country’s international schools in search of higher standards and more possibilities. Norwegian pupils also lag behind their European counterparts in the PISA tests, and foreign students outnumber Norwegians on prestigious university courses.

Allowing the top ten percent to be taught at a higher level “appears to be frivolous, and lacking in reality,” claims Mr Vilno.

Socialist Left Party (SV) leader and Minister of Education, Kristin Halvorsen, underlines Oslo municipality is obligated to allow children to attend school near their home.

“It’s important that children and young people belong to one class, and that the class is a meeting place across social, economic, and ability conditions,” she says.

Torger Ødegaard, Oslo City Council’s Education Advisor for the Conservative Party (H), encourages wider thinking, however.

“In Norway, it is accepted that we focus on sports talents from a young age. I think we should also do this when it comes to the arts and culture.”




Published on Monday, 22nd August, 2011 at 16:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 23rd August 2011 at 15:50.

This post has the following tags: kristinhalvorsen, norwegianeducationminister, oslo, talenteducationscheme.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!