Updated: Female discrimination still current in Norwegian workplaces / News / The Foreigner

Updated: Female discrimination still current in Norwegian workplaces. Sexism at work is still alive and well in Norway. Almost 25 percent of women in male-dominated jobs experiences discrimination, according to a new survey. The Work Life poll, commissioned by employment agency Manpower, shows women working in construction or industrial production are more liable to experience chauvinism, irrespective of whether they are colleagues, middle management, or executives. Less than 20 percent of men working in the industrial production sector say they feel inequality was a problem.

sexism, discrimination, genderinequality, equalpay, promotion



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Updated: Female discrimination still current in Norwegian workplaces

Published on Monday, 7th March, 2011 at 10:02 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 7th March 2011 at 14:12.

Sexism at work is still alive and well in Norway. Almost 25 percent of women in male-dominated jobs experiences discrimination, according to a new survey.

Pile of newspapers and eyeglasses
Pile of newspapers and eyeglasses
Photo: tkemot/Shutterstock Images


The Work Life poll, commissioned by employment agency Manpower, shows women working in construction or industrial production are more liable to experience chauvinism, irrespective of whether they are colleagues, middle management, or executives.

Less than 20 percent of men working in the industrial production sector say they feel inequality was a problem.

Differences between the sexes are least in the education, hotel and restaurant, property, and public administration sectors.

“It is common for women to experience equality in the workplace in the education field.  This may have something to do with the fact women in these jobs have been in the majority for many years. They find it is worst in the typically male-dominated professions, where most women encounter conditions are different for men,” says Maalfrid Brath, Manpower’s CEO.

63 percent of women here feel this mainly concerns their chances of becoming a senior executive. They are also dissatisfied with lack of equal pay and promotion possibilities.

The survey also shows women in Sweden believe discrimination is worse for them than for their Norwegian counterparts in all areas. Almost 3 out of 4 complain over unequal pay, and 48 percent about no forum for their ideas and suggestions.

“These figures are extremely interesting, and show it is important to maintain a good diversity of men and women at all levels in businesses,” Ms Brath says.



Published on Monday, 7th March, 2011 at 10:02 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 7th March 2011 at 14:12.

This post has the following tags: sexism, discrimination, genderinequality, equalpay, promotion.





  
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