Use of solar energy in Norway minimal / News / The Foreigner

Use of solar energy in Norway minimal. Number of solar thermal collectors installed in Europe much higher. It was solar energy day in Norway yesterday. Today marks the start of the second European Solar days. The number of collectors per citizen in Denmark is 28 times as high as it is here.A myth According to the organisation Framtiden i våre hender (the future in our hands), over two-thirds of the energy consumption of houses and industry goes on hot water and heating. Much of this can be replaced by heat produced by solar thermal collectors.

norway, sun, solar, energy, thermal, collectors, panels, heating, hot, water, norwegian, houses



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Use of solar energy in Norway minimal

Published on Thursday, 14th May, 2009 at 21:24 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Number of solar thermal collectors installed in Europe much higher.

Sun through the trees
Sun through the trees
Photo: Michael Sandelson


It was solar energy day in Norway yesterday. Today marks the start of the second European Solar days. The number of collectors per citizen in Denmark is 28 times as high as it is here.

A myth

According to the organisation Framtiden i våre hender (the future in our hands), over two-thirds of the energy consumption of houses and industry goes on hot water and heating. Much of this can be replaced by heat produced by solar thermal collectors.

“The myth that there is no point in using the sun to heat either water or the houses in this country has lasted for far too long. Both low electricity prices and a false impression that Norway is too far north have contributed to this misunderstanding” says Aril Hermstad, the head of the organisation.

Leading manufacturers

Norway has some of the world’s leading manufacturers of solar cells.

“It’s a paradox that...they cannot be bothered to use zero emission solar heating themselves”, continues Hermstad.

And things don’t look any better when taking in to account that solar energy is noiseless and available to be used throughout the world, according to a report published by the researcher Liv Thoring.

Too expensive

Norsk Solfangerproduksjon AS, one of the companies that produces the catchers estimates that the cost of installing these for a household with up to four members is approximately 30,000 kroner including VAT.

This may not seem like much in relation to the return, but it is an expense that few are willing to incur, apparently.

“Politicians must increase the level of support to private households to cover at least half the investment costs” says Hermstad.

In addition, the costs to solar cell for develop the technology further are too high, according to Thoring’s report.

“Access to capital and pure silicon – a metalloid used in solar cells – are two of the biggest challenges the solar cell industry is facing.”

Five-year perspective

At the moment, the investment of installing the system takes 15 years to pay off. Hermstad thinks this is too long and would like to see it brought down to five.

Solar energy could also be competitive within five years. Both of these are dependent on government investment, the report says.

A thermal collector system can supply between 50 and 70 percent of amount of hot water used, and between 20 and 30 percent of the heating requirements for an average-sized Norwegian home annually.

Definitions

A thermal collector system stores energy when sunlight hits an absorbent surface, and transports the heat away by use of a circuit filled with either fluid or gas.

A solar cell is a panel that coverts solar energy to electricity.

Silicon (rather than silicone) is a chemical element.

(Source: Wikipedia)



Published on Thursday, 14th May, 2009 at 21:24 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norway, sun, solar, energy, thermal, collectors, panels, heating, hot, water, norwegian, houses.





  
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