Walking far in airports is good, not discrimination / News / The Foreigner

Walking far in airports is good, not discrimination. If you feel your airline has got it in for you because of the gate distance and where you are from, stop by Oslo Gardermoen Airport next time you are travelling to northern and western Norway. Regional paper Nordlys had an article about passengers to these destinations recently. Having obtained figures for January to mid-February this year, journalists reported Gate 19 – or “pier south” as it is termed – saw 193 Nord-Norge flights.

osloairport, gardermoenairport, norwayflights



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Walking far in airports is good, not discrimination

Published on Thursday, 28th February, 2013 at 15:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 28th February 2013 at 22:43.

If you feel your airline has got it in for you because of the gate distance and where you are from, stop by Oslo Gardermoen Airport next time you are travelling to northern and western Norway.

Oslo Gardermoen terminal
Oslo Gardermoen terminal
Photo: Oslo Lufthavn AS


Regional paper Nordlys had an article about passengers to these destinations recently.

Having obtained figures for January to mid-February this year, journalists reported Gate 19 – or “pier south” as it is termed – saw 193 Nord-Norge flights.

Extra distance walked, lolloped, or run – depending on how late the individual was – for these north and westbound passengers was 250 metres.

This may provoke strong regional feeling – or not – but western Norway travellers were worse-off, the report showed. 275 Gate 19 flights went to the oil-blessed western part of the country in the same period.

The Foreigner asked Norwegian School of Sports Sciences professor Sigmund A. Anderssen what the health benefits are instead.

According to him – and this may come as a relief to some – “speed is not the essential as long as the distance is constant” when looking at trimming off the extra bulk.

“The mean average of weight lost by a person when walking is approximately 0.8 kilocalories per kilogram of body weight per kilometre. Walking 250 metres with a bodyweight of 86 kilos equals 2.2 grams of fat,” he says.

For the climate-conscious, the sports academic adds “you exhale approximately one litre of CO2 per minute when perambulating.”

There is no real difference the higher the walking-speed unless one starts running.

At the same time, those carrying a laptop bag or rucksack weighing about eight to 10 kilos can reward themselves by knowing these amounts increase by about 20 percent, according to the professor.

This data may be of little comfort to the tardy traveller worried about either catching the plane or regional alliances, but passengers can at least contemplate the health benefits while sipping the water.

“Being sedentary – sitting a lot during waking hours – is associated with impaired carbohydrate and fat metabolism, as well as reduced bone density. It increases the risk of osteoporosis in the long-run,” Professor Anderssen concludes.

Perhaps awarding EuroBonus points per kilogram lost is the answer to SAS’ current problems with the Competition Authority instead, irrespective of class of travel.




Published on Thursday, 28th February, 2013 at 15:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 28th February 2013 at 22:43.

This post has the following tags: osloairport, gardermoenairport, norwayflights.





  
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