When foreigners turn into trouble / News / The Foreigner

When foreigners turn into trouble. EDITORIAL: Norway’s employers are having a tough time when it comes to foreign, competent labour. Several boundaries are xenophobic, some are blurred, and others are blind. In recent swoops on various businesses in Rogaland, authorities have been clamping down on paperless asylum seekers and issued penalties for almost 900,000 kroner.  None of the refugees was allowed to live or work in Norway. With few or no tax cards courtesy of the Norwegian state, employing and paying them was illegal.

foreignlabournorway, foreignerworkdiscrimination



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When foreigners turn into trouble

Published on Wednesday, 11th January, 2012 at 15:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 12th January 2012 at 09:32.

EDITORIAL: Norway’s employers are having a tough time when it comes to foreign, competent labour. Several boundaries are xenophobic, some are blurred, and others are blind.

Norwegian border
Norwegian border
Photo: Hardo Müller/Flickr


In recent swoops on various businesses in Rogaland, authorities have been clamping down on paperless asylum seekers and issued penalties for almost 900,000 kroner. 

None of the refugees was allowed to live or work in Norway. With few or no tax cards courtesy of the Norwegian state, employing and paying them was illegal.

In three separate cases, Stavanger churchwarden’s office was fined 96,000 kroner, a Sola-based baker 300,000 kroner, and over 30 Rogaland firms 500,000 kroner for allowing 74 paperless people to work for up to a decade.

On a national level, Norway’s government has tightened its asylum policy in recent years. It now claims it is a success, apart from a European Court of Human Rights-enforced climb-down about Greece. 

Several asylum seekers warned they were going to sue Norway for wrongful deportation to Greece, and the government has given the country 160 million kroner to help aid asylum and migration.

Readers of The Foreigner may also remember last year’s Maria Amelie (Madina Salamova) case. She was deported to Russia, despite several legal battles, a job offer, and protests from many ethnic Norwegians including Socialist Left Party (SV) leader Kristin Halvorsen. A Master’s diploma graduate, Ms Salamova is now back in Norway with a work permit.

Amongst a growing ‘non’ from Norway’s pure born-and-bred population, immigrants have actually gained in popularity since 22 July. Nevertheless, other reports show even legal, labour-minded foreigners are causing Norwegian employers problems.

If it is not the language or cultural barrier, even in multicultural firms, skin-coloured xenophobia has traditionally existed for at least 20 years and still does, despite stringent anti-discrimination legislation

Researchers have now found job applicants without a Norwegian-sounding name, with equal or even higher qualifications to their Norwegian counterparts, are losing out. 

The chances of being called in for interview decrease by 25 percent, even though potential employers spoke warmly of a multicultural society. Previous bad experiences were to blame, apparently. Some qualified labour migrants even end up on the street because they cannot get work. 

Norway needs foreign workers to fill jobs the domestic workforce cannot or do not wish to manage. The majority of immigrants are probably not here to steal, live off the welfare state, or convert entire businesses’ workforces to Islam. They wish to contribute.

What is the problem?




Published on Wednesday, 11th January, 2012 at 15:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 12th January 2012 at 09:32.

This post has the following tags: foreignlabournorway, foreignerworkdiscrimination.





  
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