Women’s career and pay more favourable in Norway, says OECD / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Women’s career and pay more favourable in Norway, says OECD. Women in OECD countries earn 16 percent less than men do on average but Norway comes out well for median incomes, the organisation’s new report shows. The pay gap within the OECD area increases to an average of 22 percent for women who have children. For those without children the gap can be as little as 7 percent.  Norway, however, has one of the lowest gender pay gaps compared to other OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries. 

norwaywomensemployment, workingnorway



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Women’s career and pay more favourable in Norway, says OECD

Published on Wednesday, 19th December, 2012 at 13:33 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Women in OECD countries earn 16 percent less than men do on average but Norway comes out well for median incomes, the organisation’s new report shows.



The pay gap within the OECD area increases to an average of 22 percent for women who have children. For those without children the gap can be as little as 7 percent. 

Norway, however, has one of the lowest gender pay gaps compared to other OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries. 

The gap is larger for top earners, however, with an average 17 percent difference between men and women. The OECD says this suggests the existence of a so-called “glass ceiling”.

At the same time, women also have a higher representation among parliament and businesses in Norway after a law was introduced in 2006.

This legislation means that women must make up at least 40 percent of board seats in certain countries, including those that are listed on the stock exchange.

The OECD report also states that equality can also be achieved through access to more affordable childcare for parents, and that governments could help by providing benefits that help with childcare costs.

Norway has one of the most favourable welfare systems for parents of children in the world.



Published on Wednesday, 19th December, 2012 at 13:33 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwaywomensemployment, workingnorway.





  
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